Partners

  • Institute Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN) of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    Institute Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN) of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    The ICCN is the semi-autonomous government authority charged with the management of protected areas in the DRC. The mandate of the ICCN is to control and patrol these protected areas, collect and analyse data from the field, and facilitate tourism where possible. We began our work with the ICCN in Garamba National Park in 2005 under the leadership of Pasteur Cosma Wilungala.
  • The Elephant Crisis Fund
    Elephant Crisis Fund (ECF)
    The Elephant Crisis Fund (ECF), a joint initiative of Save the Elephants and the Wildlife Conservation Network, is a flexible and responsive fund that supports the best efforts from the most trusted organisations across the world working to save elephants. Since 2015, the ECF has not only contributed more than US$3.4 million to African Parks, but also expertise on best practices in elephant conservation. This has benefited critical surveillance and intelligence-based protection for some of our most threatened elephant populations in Central, Southern and Western Africa.
  • European Union
    European Union
    The European Union (EU) has been a long-standing funder, first supporting our growth into Central Africa in 2005. Their investment over the years has helped create areas of stability in a volatile region, and has helped attract additional funding and partners. The EU has been critical in managing large landscapes namely the Garamba National Park and its periphery, the Chinko Conservation Area, the Ennedi Natural and Cultural Reserve, the Greater Zakouma Ecosystem and the Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Improved management of those ecological important landscapes through effective park management and governance, safety and security for people and wildlife in respect of their respective rights and opportunities in green sectors for local populations contribute to the EU NaturAfrica’ initiative.
  • The Wildcat Foundation
    The Wildcat Foundation
    The Wildcat Foundation is a private philanthropic foundation whose purpose is to help save and provide for the long-term conservation of endangered wildlife and wild places in Africa. It supports innovative new approaches that disrupt traditional wildlife protection paradigms, focusing largely on medical training, aircraft, equipment and technology for Rangers. The Wildcat Foundation first partnered with African Parks in 2014, supporting the historic 500-elephant move in Malawi. Over the years, Wildcat has invested in seven parks across six countries. Wildcat has been instrumental in assisting with the development and implementation a new law enforcement strategy at Garamba National Park, which has resulted in a 95% reduction in elephant poaching.
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
    The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) operates to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats. USFWS have provided grants to support our anti-poaching programmes in Chinko, Garamba, Odzala-Kokoua, and Zakouma. In 2017 USFWS, alongside USAID, continued to support the management and protection of Garamba and Chinko protected areas in Central Africa, as well as our work with WWF in the Sangha Tri-National and Northern Congo Forest Landscape and provided additional support for elephant surveillance in Zakouma.
  • USAID
    U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) operates the Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE) with the aim of conserving the ecological integrity of the Congo Basin Forest for the benefit of local people and the global community. With their support, we are able to carry out the core protected area management of Garamba National Park and Chinko. In addition, through USAID funding, African Parks in consortia with African Wildlife Foundation is improving community resilience and wildlife conservation in the Mbomou-Uele border region.
  • Randgold Logo
    Randgold Resources
    Randgold’s exploration strategy is based on the discovery of world class orebodies within the major greenstone belts of West and Central Africa. Randgold operates five gold mines in three African countries – Loulo, Gounkoto and Morila in Mali; Tongon in Côte d’Ivoire and Kibali in the DRC. Randgold is committed to creating lasting benefits for its host countries and the communities around its operations, ensuring that the exploitation of a host country’s natural resources improves the lives of all stakeholders.
  • The U.S. Department of State
    The U.S. Department of State
    The U.S. Department of State, through both the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) and the Bureau of African Affairs (AF), advances good governance and peace and security, pre-requisites for sustainable economic development and protection of natural resources. They began providing support in 2018 and have committed over US$3 million for ranger uniforms, equipment and training for African Parks teams operating in Chad, Central African Republic, Malawi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo and Zambia. They have also supported leadership development and core training infrastructure, all of which leads to enhanced capacity to disrupt illegal wildlife trade and promote regional stability.